Appalachian Symposium

20sep1:00 pm- 8:00 pmAppalachian Symposium1:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Event Details

1 PM “WHAT’S NEW IN APPALACHIAN EXTRACTION? APPALACHIAN PLASTICS
Join Mountain Watershed Association’s Community Organizer Tyler Cannon in an exploration of the Appalachian Storage Hub (ASH) and related petrochemical infrastructure in our region. The proposed developments include ethane crackers, miles of pipelines and underground storage facilities that would create a plastics-processing network that stretches from Catlettsburg, Ky., along the Ohio River and adjacent areas, to Beaver, Pa. The development is driven by international investments, and it is unparalleled in scale for modern industry in the region. Cannon will focus on the most recent developments with these projects, the connection between shale gas and plastics, and how audience members can get involved in the fight for the future of the region.

2 PM “REBUILDING THE APPALACHIAN ECONOMY FROM THE GROUND UP WITH TRIPLE-BOTTOM-LINE SUSTAINABILITY”
Jacob Hannah is Coalfield Development’s very first conservation coordinator, focusing on creating innovative ways to protect and incorporate wild, wonderful West Virginia into the new and bright future

Hannah grew up homeschooled on a mountaintop farm with his six siblings, where he learned the appreciation of stewarding clean water, sustainable agroforestry, hunting and the bond among man, mountain and maker. After getting an associate’s degree as a first-generation student in business management from Garrett College and a bachelor’s in management for sustainability from Bucknell University, Hannah studied cultural sustainability in France and Scotland for six months. Testing out his triple-bottom-line sustainability concepts, he spent three years developing revitalization initiatives for coal towns in central Pennsylvania and food security programs in Western Maryland.

3 PM “THE BROWNSVILLE PROJECT”
Inspired by an invisible, yet powerful overlap in their family histories, Clory Jackson and Caroline Hann have embarked on a creative journey to explore and confront the history and social impact of Brownsville, a forgotten community that was nested in Frostburg in the 1860s.

This interactive theatre experience seeks to explore the story of a place where race, class, gender and family pride meet. Come actively remember the community of Brownsville. Learn how Brownsville was created and discover how there is “a Brownsville” present in every community today. Where’s the Brownsville in your life?

4 PM “THE LIVING NEW DEAL”
With the Green New Deal resolution in mind – specifically, its feasibility – Brent McKee will discuss and present photographs about the “green” aspects of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, 1933-1943, both nationally and locally. This will include Works Progress Administration climate science projects, sanitation projects funded by the Public Works Administration, tree planting by the Civilian Conservation Corps and legislation and art designed to promote the conservation of wildlife.

McKee is an independent historian who has worked with the Living New Deal since 2011. Living New Deal is a nonprofit history organization based in San Francisco whose mission is to find, document and present the legacy of the New Deal (bridges, roads, buildings, parks, etc.).

McKee grew up in Annapolis and has a Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a Master of History degree from American Public University. He lives in West Virginia.

6 PM COMMUNITY SINGING FOR CLIMATE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
Join us for the healing, renewal, understanding and power when our voices and imaginations visit with one another in music. Singer-songwriters Kim Alexander, Doug Hendren, Sparky and Rhonda Rucker, and Rob Smith will lead us in songs that explore our entanglement in Earth’s changing climate.

Time

(Friday) 1:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Location

Frostburg State University

101 Braddock Road Frostburg MD 21532